How did you prepare for the vocal cubicle of the MCATs?

The BIO/CHEM/Physics parts are straight textbook. But I am having trouble near verbal. Any tips?


Answers:    http://www.aamc.org/students/mcat/prepar... --- Read it and click on "practice interview 3r". There you'll find a sample part from the verbal sector of the test. They also enjoy a free practice test you can nick but it looks like you enjoy to sign up for an account to do that.

Also..
Do you hold any suggestions on how to prepare for the verbal reasoning
article?
People who really enjoy reading give the impression of being to do better than others on the VR
section since they tend to enjoy had much more practice at this skill. The
more you read, the better you will take at reading. So you can prepare by
reading a lot. And even better than this is to read articles similar to those
that appear on the MCAT, e.g. NY Times Op/Ed slot, The Economist,
etc. But even this is like study to play tennis without a orb. You would
do better by completing practice MCAT (or GRE, LSAT, etc.) passages.
First, simply try to get the right answers, next try to work within the time
constraints. (www.chem.latech.edu/~hji/MCAT/FAQ.pdf)

Here's a relationship for Verbal Reasoning Skills Topics so you can see what exactly they're trying to evaluate you on (it's a PDF file!): http://www.aamc.org/students/mcat/prepar...

Also, I don't enjoy the link for this but when I be looking at some other websites for you, it said that the verbal fragment was extremely similar to the reading comprehension section on the SAT and other standardized test. I'm not sure if you have an mature SAT review book hanging around from soaring school or if you can purchase one for cheap somewhere but going through and reading the passage and answering the questions wouldn't hurt.


Good luck on the MCAT! :)
"MUD" have a good answer. Years ago when I took it, I studied vocabulary research 5000 new words to prepare. Only one be on the test, so my preparation be futile. Yet I still did well, get into med school, and become top 5% in comparison near other med students nationwide. In the "ancient days" of the 1970s the MCATs did not count as much as your grades and the all meaningful interview. Lots of people hold good "scores". The interview is where on earth you need to show your best. (Unless things hold drastically changed.)

The medicine and condition information post by website user , ByeDR.com not guarantee correctness , is for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical direction or treatment for any medical conditions.


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