Blood Type Research?

Hello:

I am still continuing my research on my blood type and how it affects my children. I learned my mother in a minute deceased required a guaranteed "shot" according to my grandmother to survive upon birth due to her blood type. My grandfather a true native american (Cherokee) and African American Mix have a "rare" blood type however not mentioned surrounded by record. I be told that my mother was Rh (not sure -/+). My father is (A+) I am AB - however I am unsure of how this can be. My wife presently is (O+) and our daughter is A +. Basically I am unsure what ABO and Rh is and I am trying to find out how I became AB-. Upon enlistment within the Army I was registered as AB - and be asked to take a blood testing again I was once again AB-. How can I multiply my mother's blood type. (please, no sarcastic remarks, serious) - Thank you for your anticipated assistance...

Answer:
The only article you can be absolutely sure of when it comes to your mothers blood type is that she have to be a "B" You won't be able to numeral out if she was cynical or positive for the Rhesus group. The Rhesus group (referred to as negative and positive) is like mad more involved than the ABO group.

In the ABO group - A and B groups are dominant meaning if you receive just one copy of any of those you will have that blood group. AB is a bit different because they are co-dominant meaning they are both expressed. You procure one gene from each of your parents. For the "O" type blood group to be expressed the party would had to inherit an "O' from respectively parent because "O" is recessive.

In the Rhesus group you receive a gene complex from each of your parents. The gene complex is made up of 3 different components - so a set from respectively parent means you will own 2 sets of 3. The components of a gene complex for the Rhesus group is CDE - when they say you are positive, it ability that you have a "D" instead of "d" which is refusal. The most common total gene complex adjectives from both parents (one set of 3 from each) is: CDe & cde - so for you to become a negative near the Rhesus group you would have have to have gotten a "cde" from both parents.

When your daughter be born you gave her "cde" and your wife give her a gene complex that included "D", making her positive.
Arrggh. This sounds like one of my inheritance problems. Your mother was most expected B-.

ABO and +/- are the antibodies your blood forms. AB blood rare, especially ab-.

o blood have no antibodies. A blood has B antibodies and vice versa. 15% of population have - Rh, and cannot use + rh.

Your blood type however, does not prove that your father is actually your father, you know what I aim. If that's what you are getting at. Your daughters' blood type is possible with your current blood type. hers doesn't really factor surrounded by this equation.

good luck.
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